Hospital Queen Elizabeth II | A+ A A- | Biru Ungu Hijau Oren Merah
Pilihan Bahasa : English Bahasa Melayu
Facebook Feed
Pekeliling JPA

JPA PPSPP

Pekeliling Kemajuan Pentadbiran Awam

Pekeliling Kemajuan Pentadbiran Awam

Warga HQE II
Warganegara
Warga Asing
Bancian
Apakah nama yang sesuai untuk menggantikan nama Hospital Queen Elizabeth II?
Hospital Bandaraya Kota Kinabalu (HBKK)
Hospital Damai Kota Kinabalu (HDKK)
Hospital Damai Luyang (HDL)
Jumlah Undian: 1270
Bancian ini akan ditutup pada 2017/9/20 3:05
Komen?

Artikel > Media > Early intervention with new treatment enables durable control of HIV-like virus in monkeys

Early intervention with new treatment enables durable control of HIV-like virus in monkeys

Viral suppression: Working in a monkey model of HIV, scientists discovered that a dual-antibody therapy can boost the immune system to control the infection and prevent the virus from returning.
Credit: Image courtesy of Rockefeller University

There are more than 25 drugs to control HIV, yet the virus remains one of the world's biggest health problems. One of the many challenges with existing therapies is that a dormant version of the virus is always lurking in the background, ready to attack the immune system as soon as treatment is interrupted.

Now, new research from The Rockefeller University and the National Institutes of Health suggests that treatment with two anti-HIV antibodies immediately after infection enables the immune system to effectively control the virus, preventing its return for an extended period.

"This form of therapy can induce potent immunity to HIV, allowing the host to control the infection," says Michel Nussenzweig, head of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunology and an Investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. "It works by taking advantage of the immune system's natural defenses, similar to what happens in some forms of cancer immunotherapy."

The research was conducted in macaque monkeys, using a model of HIV infection called simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV). Although this model does not precisely mimic human HIV infection, the findings suggest that immunotherapy should be explored as a way of controlling the virus and boosting an immune response that might be capable of controlling the infection in people. The study publishes on March 13 in Nature.

Long-term control

The two drugs used in the study, 3BNC117 and 10-1074, belong to a class of molecules called broadly neutralizing antibodies. They were discovered by the Nussenzweig laboratory in studies of "elite controllers," people whose immune systems have a rare ability to fight off the virus. Each antibody binds to a different site of the virus, preventing its damaging effects from different angles.

13 monkeys were inoculated with the SHIV virus, and then given three intravenous infusions of the two antibodies over a two-week period. The treatment suppressed the virus to levels near or below the limit of detection, and its effect lasted for as long as six months. After the antibodies had cleared out of the monkeys' bodies, the virus rebounded in all but one animal.

But then, 5 to 22 months later, something remarkable happened: six of the monkeys spontaneously regained control of the virus. Their virus levels once again plummeted to undetectable levels and remained suppressed for another 5 to 13 months.

These six monkeys were also able to maintain healthy levels of key immune cells after receiving the antibody infusions.

In addition, four other monkeys that did not regain complete control of the virus nevertheless showed promising responses to the treatment: they maintained extremely low viral loads and healthy levels of key immune cells for two to three years after infection. In total, 10 of the 13 monkeys benefitted from antibody immunotherapy.

Feasibility in humans

Nussenzweig and colleagues also investigated what aspect of the immune system was helping the monkeys ward off the virus's return. They gave the six controller monkeys an antibody that targets and depletes a type of immune cell called cytotoxic T cells. Infusion of this antibody immediately increased the amount of SHIV in the monkeys' blood and decreased cytotoxic T cell levels, indicating that these cells play a key role in preventing SHIV replication after therapeutic antibody infusion.

The researchers are now repeating this experiment after a longer exposure to the virus, waiting two to six weeks after SHIV infection before administering the therapeutic antibody infusions. This is how long it usually takes for an HIV-infected person to be diagnosed and able to receive treatment.

Clinical trials testing the antibody combination in humans are also underway at The Rockefeller University Hospital.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Rockefeller University. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Y Nishimura et al. Early antibody therapy can induce long lasting immunity to SHIV. Nature, 2017 DOI: 10.1038/nature21435
 

Navigasi Artikel
Previous article Targeting cancer stem cells improves treatment effectiveness, prevents metastasis Where you live could determine risk of heart attack, stroke or dying of heart disease Next article
Carian
Intranet

Sistem Intranet

Garis Panduan EKSA

Garis Panduan EKSA height=

1GovUC Outlook Web App

1GovUC OWA

iSPAAA

iSPAAA

Maklum balas daripada orang awam berkenaan perkhidmatan KKM

 

Kalendar Aktiviti
Tahukah Anda ?
Senyuman yang diakhiri dengan ketawa mengaktifkan bahan kimia badan dan secara tidak langsung merendahkan risiko penyakit jantung, tekanan darah tinggi, strok, arthritis dan ulser.
Kod QR HQE2

QEH2 QR Code

Imbas menggunakan

telefon bimbit

atau

PDA (Smartphone)


Hak Cipta Terpelihara Hospital Queen Elizabeth II 2017 Dasar Privasi | Dasar Keselamatan

PENAFIAN
Hospital Queen Elizabeth II tidak akan bertanggungjawab ke atas sebarang kehilangan atau kerosakan yang diakibatkan oleh penggunaan maklumat yang dicapai daripada portal ini.